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This is an interesting moment because it shows Anderson's consciousness of how such industriously curated worlds - like his elegant Grand Budapest - are fragile.  Even in his earlier films there seems to be a recurring theme of people trying to preserve an imagined, idealised world, and his visual style echoes this. For example in Rushmore, the main character Max Fischer decides his favourite place to be is at school and so he'll stay there forever, and in Moonrise Kingdom two children believe they can find the perfect life by running away from home and evading capture. 

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There's a kind of childlike innocence about his work that I think he is trying to distil. I love how in this scene Suzie has brought all the things she needs in life - including her cat, several library books, a battery powered record player.

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