In the evening I did an extra research and was inspired by a Brazilian artist Ernesto Neto. I found the structure of his works very similar to my idea, and decided to learn and explore his art more deeply and seriously.

Ernesto Neto

Neto's work has been described as "beyond abstract minimalism". His installations are large, soft, biomorphic sculptures that fill an exhibition space that viewers can touch, poke, and walk on or through. They are made of white, stretchy material -- amorphous forms stuffed with Styrofoam pellets or, on occasion, aromatic spices. In some installations, he has also used this material to create translucent scrims that transform the space's walls and floor. His sculptures can be regarded as expression of traditional abstract form, but in their interaction with the viewer, they work on another level as well. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernesto_Neto)

Ernesto Neto has a peculiar approach to space and the body. Rio de Janeiro, his native city, epitomizes the conflict between nature and culture and this has shaped his art. His sculptures often deal with the tensions exerted by gravity on skin-thin materials and his installations often take up the entire exhibition space. He uses gossamer-thin, light, stretchable fabrics in nylon or cotton that resemble fine membranes and fixes them to the ceiling by long, stretched threads so that his works hang down into the room, creating shapes that are almost organic. Sometimes they are filled with scented spices and hang in tear-shaped forms like gigantic mushrooms or huge soft, blobby, stretchy membrane-like things. He also creates peculiar soft sculptures which the visitor is allowed to feel through small openings in the surface or even wear. His spatial labyrinths further encourage the visitor to experience his work and interact with it. The experience must be very pleasant and unique.

...people love going to see his exhibits because these somehow manage to fill observers with the warm fuzzies and creep them out at the same time. (http://themillstone.blogspot.co.uk/2010/10/ernesto-neto.html)

 

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