Collection

RELATED ARTISTS

artists.jpg

SONG DONG "WASTE NOT" 2005

A collection of items by his mother who lived during the cultural revolution. This reflects the lack of resources during the time and the need to conserve and save. The way it is presented by this artist is ordered and adds a dimension of aesthetic depth. Additionally, the choice to exhibit this collection as a piece of artwork acts a a social commentary on the wasteful behavior of modern day people. It may also be interpreted as an insight into the personal life of Dong's family. This is evident when a neon sign accompanied the piece, 'Dad, don't worry, mum and all the family are well'.

DIETER ROTH "FLAT WASTE" 2016

Roth records a year of his life by collecting trash that fits his criteria of being less than 5mm thick. The taxonomy used by Roth to collect trash is unexpected as trash is often overlooked and ignored. However, Roth spends a lot of attention towards trash. This paints an intriguing portrait of his life or at least a year of it. 

SUSAN HILLER "AFTER THE FREUD MUSEUM" 1991 - 1996

Hiller was inspired by the Freud museum and how Freud's personal trinkets and belongings were put on display. This seemed to put inanimate objects on a pedestal simply because they were owned by Freud. Hiller undermines this celebrity worship through her own collection. By placing everyday objects, like the cow creamers, next to what is deemed culturally 'significant', such as the Mayan obsidian blades, she calls into question the inherent values of objects. Why should one be valued more than another? She accentuates her message through proximity of the items in her collection, suggesting that there is no superior or inferior object, they are treated equally in their relation to one another. 

NICHOLAS NIXON "THE BROWN SISTERS" 1975 - 2014

Nixon documented the same sisters over 40 years. Unlike Bernd and Hilla Becher who precisely line up their shots in an almost identical manner, Nixon's framing is inconsistent. The positions of the women change constantly, some years they will all be in one line, some years one sister will be infront, only to be behind her sisters in another year. This fluctuation in facial expressions and proximity to the camera, not only reminds the audience that these are real people with changing circumstances in life, but also builds a narrative within the series of photos. 

TARYN SIMON "THE INNOCENTS" 2002

'The Innocents' is a series of portrait photos depicting falsely convicted people. The photographs are reminiscent of mugshots, alluding to the fact that these people were wrongly accused of a crime they did not commit. The irony is that, through photography, Simon undermines the faith and belief in photography's accuracy as evidence. In other words, 'the medium undermines itself'. 

JIM SHAW "THRIFT STORE"

This Los Angeles artist bought art from thrift stores and displayed them as a collection. By re-contextualizing these paintings Shaw created a new piece of artwork. He had a criteria that each painting had to fulfill before he decided to purchase and curate them. This time and attention given to unappreciated paintings by both Shaw and viewers send a powerful message. He criticizes institutional art, calling into question what art should be valued and what shouldn't. 

HAIM STEINBACH "ONCE AGAIN THE WORLD IS FLAT"

Steinbach builds structures to hold up his chosen items, tying together the collection aesthetically. His work exemplifies the idea of an artist as a curator. He suggests that the display or plinth should be well considered as it is part of how the artwork is viewed. In other exhibitions Steinbach asked the public to contribute to his collection. 

MARTIN PARR "BORING POST CARDS" 2004

Through this collection, Parr imparts his judgement onto a collection of postcards. This insinuation is seen by some as offensive or insulting, however by appropriating these postcards into his collection, a new meaning is imbued upon them. They act as his commentary on commercial photography, 'boring'.

OLIVER CROY AND OLIVER ELSER "THE 387 HOUSES OF PETER FRITZ"

Aritst, Oliver Croy and architecture critic, Oliver Elser presented a collection of miniature houses as found objects. These models were originally created by Peter Fritz a Austrian insurance clerk. They were made from easily gathered materials and realistically model a range of different buildings. Impressed by his creativity, passion and dedication, the pair exhibited this collection, citing and crediting the original fabricator, Peter Fritz. 

RICHARD WENTWORTH "MAKING DO AND GETTING BY"

Wentworth photographs found sculptures or instances of objects being transformed for functionality. This brings sculpture into the real everyday lives, and by re-contextualizing them he showcases these as a coherent collection. 

Sun Min Kim has not chosen a license for this content.

Comments

    Add comment