Friday 10th March

This morning I have been completing some sketchbook work, doing the second page on the work we did on Monday and then putting in the prints I did yesterday into my sketchbook. I don’t really like the work we did on Monday, and I am not sure how relevant it is, but I think it is good to put it in anyway and its not as if two pages could really put a dampener on the whole project. I am more pleased this morning with my prints, and though they are quite abstract at the moment, I think that they look pleasing and explore the colour scheme and some of the textures I have been looking at in an interesting way.

Following this I went to Kings Cross to do another fitting session for the third year students, which was again very fun to see how much they can do in a short space of time. It is also interesting to note how much time they spend tweaking designs and working on the body, and although I know that by the time you get to the final year the designs are less abstract and are slightly more about the wearability of the pieces as well as the ideas, seeing how a design looks on the body is very important before you make it to allow time to let the design to grow.

I have also finally done my colour scheme page with a collage based on my research from the paint bombs used in protests, and the Holi celebrations, which I am pleased with. I think it shows where I have got my colours from whilst still being an interesting page, and ties in well with the paper prints I have done so far.

Apart from doing some more annotations for my workflow, this evening I also went to a talk at the Women’s Collective in Mayfair around dressing for power, which I thought would be relevant for my project. However, I was very disappointed, as they had some odd panellists, the male owner of a suiting company, a female entrepreneur originally based in men’s accessories and the female executive of Fortnum and Masons, none of whom seemed to have any more of a kind of expertise or insight into the subject than I do. Most of the discussion was based around superficialities not to my knowledge based on reliable research, such as stereotypical differences in behaviour between men and women. Furthermore, the comments were more statements of what is the case in terms of the perception of the way women dress and are viewed in the workplace, rather than an exploration of the subject, discussion of why it is that way and how it could change, or philosophical debate. All in all, it rather more intensely irritated me than anything else, although this in itself could be useful in testing what I really believe and seeing how I could input these ideas into what I am doing. It is slightly annoying as I could have either spent this time doing more useful or enjoyable things, but what is done is done I guess.

Isabella Smith has not chosen a license for this content.